State of Change, & Found

Photography Review

David Flanagan | Found

Emilio Cresciani |State of Change
Photo Access | Until 7 November 2020

These exhibitions present the outcome of work undertaken by 2019 and 2020 PhotoAccess Dark Matter Residents, David Flanagan and Emilio Cresciani. These residencies provide a supported opportunity for artists to produce new photo-media work that incorporates darkroom-based or other alternative photographic processes.

Opening the exhibition, Virginia Rigney, Senior Visual Arts Curator at the Canberra Museum and Gallery, noted that the residents have access to one of a shrinking number of open access darkrooms left in Australia, drawing attention to the fact that what is made in those darkrooms allows us to see the materiality of bodies of work.

Flanagan was the 2019 Resident, but his work – Found – was delayed by restrictions on his movements during the pandemic. He is interested in the role of the object in contemporary photographic practice, where the majority of images are not seen as anything beyond pixels on a screen.

Various found – natural, recycled, and discarded – objects were carefully coated in Liquid Light. Images were then exposed onto those surfaces underneath an enlarger, giving new life to each item. This intricate technique liberates images from their usual 2D environment.

The surfaces Flanagan used include a trowel, an iron, a nautilus shell, and souvenir spoons. Rigney made the guests smile when she referred to an alternative Canberra museum called The Green Shed that yields up things allowing us to connect with the past in ways not possible at other museums. Now with images on them, the intriguing objects selected by Flanagan speak to us in new ways. Transformed into mementos, they assuredly will become keepsakes – especially the spoons now featuring the eyes of his wife and daughters.

Souvenir, 2020, liquid emulsion on souvenir spoons © David Flanagan
Bonsai, 2020, Silver emulsion on stone © David Flanagan

Flanagan comments, “There is an absurdity about the process which takes up to a week to prepare an object for printing, only to then to see it fail in the darkroom, which is both alluring and frustrating in equal parts. Repetition and experimentation have been the key to resolving issues with each of the materials I have chosen for this project. The element of unpredictability adds something magic to the process and a uniqueness to every object.”

Still life triptych, 2020, Silver emulsion on broken fishtank © David Flanagan

In State of Change, the 2020 Resident, Cresciani, explored the phenomenon of climate change through integrating the transformation of ice into water with photographic processes. Drawing links between these states of change, his show examines, literally, figuratively, and abstractly, human impact on Earth.

Cresciani explains, “Our ice caps are melting. As the ice melts new landscapes, new landforms are created. And scientists say that more light is absorbed onto the earth’s surface as part of this process, further accelerating global warming.”

His work documents a dialogue between massive chunks of ice and light sensitive papers in the darkroom, a reflection on climate change and all its implications. He has made photograms, recording on photographic paper what happened as his blocks of ice melted. As the viewers we can each interpret the results. In her essay for the exhibition catalogue, Anne Ferran speaks of maps, islets in a dark sea, and clusters of rocky outcrops fringed by beaches. You might see something completely different.

Breaking of Ice #7, 2020, Duratran, 42 [h] x 30cm [w], Edition of 3 + AP © Emilio Cresciani

Regardless of what we each see, the images are spectacular, particularly those presented on Duraclear. The Duratrans in light boxes are also dramatic.

On Ice #1, 2020, gelatin silver photogram, 35 x 28cm © Emilio Cresciani

PhotoAccess Director Kirsten Wehner rightly says, “Emilio and David have produced two cutting edge exhibitions showcasing what the program aims to foster; a challenged perception of what contemporary darkroom photography can offer.”

This review was first published in the Canberra Times on 2.11.20 and on its Website here. It is also on the Canberra Critics Circle blog here.

Standard

Canberra – Our Streets

A few months ago I was approached by a friend to be one of a small group of Canberra photographers to do an exhibition of Canberra street photography. In due course, three of us – Ian Copland, David Chalker and myself – agreed to put together an exhibition. A venue was arranged. We then set about capturing our images. Along the way we agreed on how many prints we each would provide, the size of those prints and the prices we would ask for them. The exhibition will be hung on 21 November 2017 and be on display from 22 November until 4 December at The Front Cafe gallery in Wattle Street, Lyneham (in Canberra). We will officially open the exhibition at 6 PM on 22 November. We have publicised the exhibition on social media (Facebook, Instagram and Twitter) and by distributing this card through various channels and via email:

EPSON MFP image

We have also sought to get publicity in various local print media.

Eventually I had gathered some 340 images to choose from. The task was not altogether easy, but the 14 A3 size prints that I eventually chose to print are below.

Busking - Jamison

Busking – Jamison

This image of a young busker outside the Jamison Centre in Macquarie was taken on 13 August 2016, before the exhibition idea was floated. I had to include it in the exhibition because I love the colours and the diagonal shadow. The seated man using his laptop seems oblivious of the busker’s performance, but may have been enjoying it.

White Goods - Belconnen

White Goods – Belconnen

This image was taken outside the door to a warehouse where I was waiting to take delivery of a new item that I had purchased for our new home on 24 March 2017. The woman in the image was standing a short distance along near these old white goods. I grabbed the image on my iPhone.

Wet Crossing - Manuka

Wet Crossing – Manuka

This image was also taken on my iPhone whilst waiting to be picked up on an extremely wet night in Manuka on 30 March 2017.

Bar Upstairs - Manuka

Bar Upstairs – Manuka

On the same wet night and using the same iPhone camera, I took this image of an older man in the Manuka shopping centre, doing his best to raise money to support himself close to a couple of popular nightspots.

Looking Inside - Lyneham

Looking Inside – Lyneham

On 6 April 2017 whilst Looking around the Lyneham shops near to our exhibition venue, I spied this man looking inside a storage space accessed from the laneway.

Thinking Music - Dickson

Thinking Music – Dickson

During a walk with my camera from Lyneham to Ainslie via Dickson, I captured this image in the Dickson shopping centre. I was attracted by the young man seemingly in deep thought whilst behind him a busker dressed in the same colours was playing his music.

Dumping Prohibited - Dickson

 

Dumping Prohibited – Dickson

On the same walk on 7 April 2017 and not far away from where the previous image was shot, I took this image of a seated young woman on her phone near this waste bin with its prohibition notice.

Laneway Conversation - Dickson

Laneway Conversation – Dickson

Also on 7 April 2017 in a laneway in another part of the shopping precinct of Dickson, I was attracted to this interaction between the brightly clad man and a woman and child walking past a faded advertising sign for the same company the man is employed by.

Looking at the screen - Dickson

Looking at the screen – Dickson

It was a most fruitful walk on 7 April 2017 because I also found this image in Dickson. Again the ubiquitous smart phone is in use, but it was the graphic elements that took my eye for this shot.

Taking a Break - Dickson

Taking a break – Dickson

My final offering from Dickson on 7 April 2017 depicts an older lady on a seat – not using a phone.

Marry Me - Dickson

Marry Me – Dickson

On another visit to Dickson on 18 April 2017 I grabbed this image of two cyclists near this large mural in a laneway. Again I used my iPhone.

Morning Paper - Dickson

Morning Paper – Dickson

On the same day with the same phone camera I was delighted to find this lady squatting low on the footpath reading a newspaper.

Communicating at The Front Cafe - Lyneham

Communicating at The Front Cafe – Lyneham

Back in Lyneham on 5 May 2017, I captured these customers of the exhibition venue communicating, not with each other, but rather with his music and her laptop. This time I was using my DSLR camera.

Passing the Hoarding - Woden

Passing the Hoarding – Woden

Visiting the other side of the city on 17 July 2017, I was attracted to this hoarding with graffiti in Woden and waited for someone to walk through to capture this image. Once again, my iPhone camera was utilised.

Standard